Application of Computer Simulation Techniques and Solid Divertor to Improve Inhibitor Squeeze Treatments in Horizontal Wells

Jordan, M.M. (Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals Ltd.) | Edgerton, M. (Texaco North Sea UK Co.) | Mackay, E.J. (Heriot Watt U.)

OnePetro 

Abstract

This paper presents field results from five scale squeeze treatments carried out on sub-sea horizontal wells from the Strathspey field in the North Sea.The development of a squeeze policy is outlined with the utilisation of laboratory coreflood data, computer simulation (SQUEEZE V Code) and the application of a novel solid divertor.

This paper outlines the practical difficulties in squeezing sub-sea horizontal wells and how some of the problems can be overcome.Some of the solutions that will be discussed include the use of variations in pump rates to encourage propagation of inhibitor along the well-bore, and the utilisation of fluid diversion techniques (both mechanical and chemical).The significance of production logging tool (PLT) data or good reservoir simulation data to evaluate the location of water production and any cross flow prior to a squeeze treatment design will also be stressed.Details of divertor selection, design simulation and the field results from the five squeeze design strategies that have been implemented will be presented.

From this series of field treatments it can be concluded that the wells have all been successfully treated with no process upset during flowback.No decline in the wells' productivity was observed as a result of these treatments.This paper shows that by using divertor agents, and by integrating near well-bore calculations (SQUEEZE V) and PLT/reservoir simulation data, it is possible to squeeze scale inhibitors into sub-sea horizontal wells without the need for coiled tubing intervention from a diving support vessel.

Introduction

The Strathspey field lies approximately 140 km North East of the Shetland Islands in a water depth of 250 ft.The field consists of two reservoirs: the Statfjord, a gas condensate reservoir, and the Brent, a black oil reservoir.