Large-Scale High-Resolution Near-Surface Geophysical Prospection for the Investigation of Archaeological Landscapes

Pregesbauer, Michael (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Trinks, Immo (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Kucera, Matthias (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Nau, Erich (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Löcker, Klaus (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Hinterleitner, Alois (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Doneus, Michael (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology) | Neubauer, Wolfgang (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology)

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Summary The in 2010 founded Austrian Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology combines geophysics, remote sensing, computer sciences, geomatics and archaeology to develop efficient and universally applicable methods and techniques for the noninvasive detection, documentation, investigation, visualization and integrative interpretation and spatial analysis of the cultural heritage of archaeological landscapes. Introduction In November 2009, Austria's largest private research funding institution, the Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft, named after the great Austrian physicist, founded the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology (LBI ArchPro) after a selection process involving 47 initially submitted and internationally reviewed proposals. The proposal for the LBI ArchPro was formulated and submitted by a team around archaeologist Professor Wolfgang Neubauer. The large and complex datasets generated by the different prospection methods require integrated archaeological interpretation based on three-and four-dimensional Geographic Information Systems and adequate tools to extract and visualize the contained archaeological information. New and adequate methods are subject of research and development to process, analyze, interpret and manage the data, with the aim to permit new ways of accessing information about endangered and hidden cultural heritage across entire archaeological landscapes.